#Biodiversity150 number 109 of 150 Little Brown Bat

109/150: This little brown bat may be gone soon! That means more mosquitoes biting you!

Animalia: Chordata: Mammalia: Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae: Myotinae: Myotis: Myotis lucifugus (LeConte, 1831)

The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) was once a common species around North America but is now considered Endangered and protected federally in Canada under the Species at Risk Act. The little brown bats are insectivores that are 6-10 cm long, weigh 5-14 grams and live for 6 to 7 years. They are nocturnal and can be found roosting in attics and barns during the summer months and in winter they hibernate in caves or mines. They are predated by small carnivores that target them when they are packed together in roost but their biggest threat is the fungus, Pseudogymnoaecus destructans. This fungus causes White Nose Syndrome in bats. The fungus thrives in cold, moist environments such as caves and mines where the little brown bats hibernate. The fungus invades the bodies of the bats disrupting their hibernation cycle, so they use up their body fat supplies before spring arrives. It is estimated that 94% of the population in the eastern half of North America has died in the last few years. With a mortality rate of 90-100%, these bats may be extirpated in a decade. The little brown bats help control the insect populations as each bat can eat approximately 3 to 7 grams of insects each night. If these bats go extinct that would mean approximately 700 fewer tons of insects are consumed each year! This includes pests that eat our crops and affect our timber. #Canada150 #Biodiversity150

Cluster of little brown bats, Myotis lucifugus, roosting. Photo Credit: Krynak Tim, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service goo.gl/qEwBSf
A little brown bat with White Nose Syndrome. Photo Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters goo.gl/XzfoT1

Here’s the barcode sequence information for this species:

Process ID: ABMC297-05

nucleotide sequence

ACTTTATACTTAATATTTGGTGCCTGAGCTGGTATAGTAGGCACTGCATTGAGCCTACTAATCCGCGCTGAGCTAGGTCAACCAGGAGCCCTGTTGGGTGATGATCAAATTTATAATGTAATTGTCACTGCCCATGCTTTCGTAATAATTTTCTTCATAGTTATACCTATTATAATCGGGGGGTTCGGAAATTGATTAGTGCCCTTAATAATTGGCGCCCCTGATATAGCTTTCCCTCGAATAAATAACATAAGCTTTTGACTACTCCCCCCATCTTTTCTATTACTGCTGGCCTCATCTATAGTTGAAGCGGGAGCAGGCACTGGTTGGACAGTGTACCCCCCTCTAGCGGGAAATCTTGCTCATGCAGGAGCCTCAGTCGATCTTGCTATTTTCTCCCTACACTTAGCAGGTGTATCTTCAATTTTAGGGGCAATCAACTTTATTACCACTATTATTAATATAAAACCTCCCGCACTTTCTCAATATCAAACACCATTATTTGTTTGATCTGTTTTAATTACAGCTGTCTTACTTCTTCTCTCTCTCCCAGTCCTAGCTGCCGGGATTACAATATTATTAACAGACCGAAACCTTAATACTACTTTCTTTGATCCTGCCGGAGGAGGAGATCCAATCCTATATCAACACTTGTTT

amino acid sequence

TLYLMFGAWAGMVGTALSLLIRAELGQPGALLGDDQIYNVIVTAHAFVMIFFMVMPIMIGGFGNWLVPLMIGAPDMAFPRMNNMSFWLLPPSFLLLLASSMVEAGAGTGWTVYPPLAGNLAHAGASVDLAIFSLHLAGVSSILGAINFITTIINMKPPALSQYQTPLFVWSVLITAVLLLLSLPVLAAGITMLLTDRNLNTTFFDPAGGGDPILYQHLF

Visual representation of DNA barcode sequence for Little Brown Bat

Learn more about it’s BIN (Barcode Index Number): BOLD:AAA1564

Title Image: A Little Brown Bat from Ohio, United States
Photo Credit: SMBishop goo.gl/FkpFXD

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