95/150: I may be small, but I’m deadly in my tiny world!


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Animalia: Chaetognatha: Sagittoidea

Chaetognatha, commonly known as arrow worms are marine invertebrates that range in size from 2 to 120 millimeters. Arrow worms are fierce predators that locate their prey, typically copepods and other zooplankton, by detecting their vibration and then use their sharp hooks and teeth at the front of their bodies to grab and immobilize their prey with neurotoxins. Continue reading “95/150: I may be small, but I’m deadly in my tiny world!”

47/150: I’m a very tiny decomposer but play a vital part in making sure plants grow!


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Animalia: Arthropoda: Diplura: Rhabdura: Campodeidae

Diplurans, also known as two-pronged bristletails, are commonly found in moist soil or leaf litter. They are sometimes mistaken for earwigs, but can be distinguished from one another because diplurans have no eyes! Continue reading “47/150: I’m a very tiny decomposer but play a vital part in making sure plants grow!”

44/150: I’ve got black tiger stripes and can be found all over Canada!


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animalia: Arthropoda: Insecta: Lepidoptera: Papilionidae: Papilioninae: Papilio: Papilio canadensis (Rothschild & Jordan, 1906)

Commonly known as the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail, Papilio canadensis is one of the most well-known butterflies in Canada because of its large size (wingspan of 7-10 cm) and distinctive pattern (yellow with black tiger stripes). They are found in all provinces with ranges extending to the north of the Arctic Circle in Yukon, Ontario, and Quebec. Continue reading “44/150: I’ve got black tiger stripes and can be found all over Canada!”

23/150: And you thought only vertebrates breathe with lungs? Meet the Arctic Pond Snail


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Animalia: Mollusca: Gastropoda: Hygrophila: Lymnaeidae: Stagnicola: Stagnicola arctica (Lea, 1864)

The Arctic Pond Snail (Stagnicola arctica) is a freshwater gastropod belonging to the family Lymnaeidae. This species occurs across northern Canada from Labrador to the Yukon Territory and are typically found in lakes, ponds, rivers, streams, ditches and muskeg pools. Continue reading “23/150: And you thought only vertebrates breathe with lungs? Meet the Arctic Pond Snail”

19/150: Invasive Species Awareness on Crab Appreciation Day


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Animalia: Arthropoda: Malacostraca: Decapoda: Portunidae: Carcinus: Carcinus maenas (Linnaeus, 1758)

The European green crab is an invasive species from the North Atlantic coast of Europe and North Africa, first found in Canadian waters in 1951 in New Brunswick and has since spread all over Atlantic Canada. It is a part of the order Decapoda which include more than 8,000 species of crustaceans including shrimp, lobsters, crayfish, hermit crabs and crabs. Continue reading “19/150: Invasive Species Awareness on Crab Appreciation Day”

8/150: I’m so much more than just moss!


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Animalia: Bryozoa: Phylactolaemata: Plumatellida: Fredericellidae

Bryozoa, commonly known as moss animals are a phylum of aquatic invertebrate animals. A single individual, known as a zooid, is typically 0.5 millimeters long. Bryozoans are an immobile species typically residing on hard surfaces such as stone or even your summer cabin’s docks! Continue reading “8/150: I’m so much more than just moss!”